Classroom Strategies | Marzano’s (Nine) High-Yield Instructional Strategies

Today, we all agree that the passive mode of teaching or rather lecture mode of teaching is passe. Teachers no longer want to drive the class. Today teaching is consciously planned to be student-driven or student-centric. Teachers spend a considerable amount of time planning their teaching. It’s no longer a “one plan fits all” approach but a “customized learning approach”. Each subject needs a different plan and sometimes lessons within a subject needs different plans.

How do teachers choose which strategy to use for teaching a lesson? Does subject-matter drive strategy, does student mix drive strategy, or is it a combination of both? How do teachers ensure whether the strategy they are using to teach a concept is appropriate or not?

We found a handy resource that lists nine instructional strategies and groups them by specific knowledge or skill areas. It will help you select an instructional strategy based on the skill/knowledge area you want to develop in students in a particular class.

In 2001, Robert Marzano, Debra Pickering and Jane Pollock published the book Classroom Instruction that Works: Research-Based Strategies for Increasing Student Achievement. Marzano and his colleagues came up with nine strategies that through research have proved to have a positive effect on students across all subjects and grades, provided they are used appropriately with specific knowledge areas.

The following table lists the instructional strategies, knowledge areas and teaching tools.

(Adapted from the book: Classroom Instruction that Works: Research-based Strategies for Increasing Student Achievement,by Robert Marzano (2001))

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Do you see yourself using any one or combination of these strategies in your class?

Would you use some to begin a class, some in the middle and some to end a class?

Do share your thoughts in the comments box below.

Kanchan Shine

Kanchan Shine

Passionate about everything related to education. I believe that the best kind of learning happens through play, experiments and fun! I love watching how children learn and love to implement play-based, hands-on teaching approaches. I get my thrill by planning activities for my children (6 yo girl & 3 yo boy) and watching them learn while having fun!

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2 Responses

  1. January 16, 2014

    […] How do teachers choose which strategy to use for teaching a lesson? Does subject-matter drive strategy, does student mix drive strategy, or is it a combination of both? How do teachers ensure whether the strategy they are …  […]

  2. June 16, 2014

    […] form the website of eVeltio Ten  (Teacher education Network): Kanchan Shine / January 10, […]

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